Religion Came First

Believers of the Bible have long argued religion or belief in God existed from the beginning as the Bible would indicate. Others have theorized religion came later after man developed civilization. Why would they think this? Mostly it would seem because they don’t want to believe the Bible. Archaeological finds in Turkey are challenging such unfounded theories:

This theory reverses a standard chronology of human origins, in which primitive man went through a “Neolithic revolution” 10,000 to 12,000 years ago. In the old model, shepherds and farmers appeared first, and then created pottery, villages, cities, specialized labor, kings, writing, art, and—somewhere on the way to the airplane—organized religion. As far back as Jean-Jacques Rousseau, thinkers have argued that the social compact of cities came first, and only then the “high” religions with their great temples, a paradigm still taught in American high schools.

Religion now appears so early in civilized life—earlier than civilized life, if Schmidt is correct—that some think it may be less a product of culture than a cause of it, less a revelation than a genetic inheritance. The archaeologist Jacques Cauvin once posited that “the beginning of the gods was the beginning of agriculture,” and Göbekli may prove his case.

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Categories: Ancient Sites, Bible | Tags: , | Leave a comment

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