Posts Tagged With: Relics

“Brother of Jesus” Box: Real or Not?

Well, we still don’t know.

The court in Israel dismissed charges against an accused forger. Why? Because legions of “experts” laid out their evidence for and against the inscription being forged.

The ossuary has an inscription that reads, “James son of Joseph, brother of Jesus.” For nearly ten years the debate has raged over these words and when they were chiseled on the side of this 2000 year old stone box. Some Christians don’t like the idea of Mary having other children other than Jesus. Scriptures do refer to Jesus having siblings, though some argue the “brothers and sisters” was more figurative. Others argue that there is no reason to discard the plain sense of the verses.

I will be reviewing this in more detail, along with other similar finds, over the next few weeks. Forgeries in archaeology cause much scrutiny to be leveled at any new find, but are “biblical” relics given more? Should they? What bias is at play, if any, from each side? And what role does the media play? It’s amazing how many articles on this court case one can read and get different information.

I thought the information age was supposed to make truth easier to find?

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Categories: Bible | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Shroud of Turin

The authenticity Shroud of Turin has been the most debated of Christian relics in history. Many believe this is the burial shroud of Jesus. Some dismiss it out of hand because of their religious or philosophical beliefs about God. Some Protestants are wary of what they perceive as a “Catholic” relic. But what if it is real? What if it is an authentic archaeological piece?

Many people are under the impression that the shroud was dated to the Middle Ages. This is untrue, the carbon datings were done in way that defies all scientific protocol: On a part of the shroud that has been often handled and repaired. No one has been able to reproduce a similar shroud with its same properties. Just in the past year, studies have pointed to it being caused by energy — a “radiation photo” of sorts — and a “death certificate” was potentially found on the shroud.

The honest thinker is compelled to look at all the evidence. In The Truth About the Shroud of Turin, Robert Wilcox traces all of the shroud’s history, the debates and the tests. He leaves it up to readers to evaluate the evidence.

Indeed, the evidence is compelling. Many will ignore it. Others dismiss it without examination. However, if one considers it with same standards applied to all other artifacts — and leaves their personal bias behind — will they continue to pretend it doesn’t exist?

An interesting test for those who believe they are open-minded and critical thinkers.

Categories: Bible, Mysteries | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

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