Posts Tagged With: internet

The Art of Invisibility

No matter how many data breaches there are, personal data stolen, and stories about hackers and government spying, it seems many people still bury their heads in the sand about security in the electronic world now embedded in our lives.

Here’s a couple tips to protect yourself and thwart corporate Big Brother from tracking your every move:

First, get yourself Firefox web browser and use its Enhanced Tracking Protection features (set on custom).

Second, activate its Facebook Container add-on so Facebook can’t snoop on you while you’re off FB.

Then enable HTTPSEverywhere which turns on HTTPS encryption automatically on sites that support it.

Finally, install duckduckgo as your default search engine, one of the few that doesn’t collect personal information, ever.

Of course there are other basic tips, like spending some money on a strong security package, but remember this: Don’t expect someone else to protect you, certainly not the government who spies just as much as the companies they pretend to regulate.

And do yourself a favor, buy Kevin Mitnick’s book, The Art of Invisibility. The notorious hacker who went legit, details in his book what goes on in the shadows of the internet and every smart and connected device you own. If Mitnick’s book doesn’t convince you to pay attention, I’m not sure what will. His tips are priceless for protecting yourself from intrusion, and for those who wave off privacy because they have nothing to hide, consider this:

You may not have anything to hide, but you have everything to protect.

Categories: What You Can Do | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Instruments of Tyranny

In the November 1970 issue of National Geographic, an article entitled “Behold the Computer Revolution,” has Peter T. White breathlessly writing on the coming changes computers would bring.  Among them are paying your bills by computer, a “truly theft-proof” credit card, the impending arrival of home computer use, and many more examples how the computer would touch every corner of our lives. This was about a decade before computers started entering homes, and over two decades before the internet would morph into the world wide web. And then White shares this from a Professor Alan F. Westin:

Man has progressed over the centuries from the status of a subject ruler to that of a citizen in a constitutional state. We must be careful to avert a situation in which the press of government for systematic information and the powerful technology of computers reverse this historical process…making us ‘subjects’ again.

Perhaps what we need now is a kind of writ of ‘habeas data’ — commanding government and powerful private organizations to produce the data they have collected and are using to make judgements about an individual, and to justify their using it.

Now, forty-eight years later, we have fallen into the very scenario that Westin warns about. It happened little by little, yet largely out in the open. How many major data breeches at banks and retailers, how many shady government data collection schemes, or how many social media abuse revelations, must continue to happen before people realize that technology is no longer their tool to control?

How long until we realize that it is being used to control them? To spy on them? To shape their beliefs?

If you read my last post, you can’t help to agree that Distraction is our greatest downfall. It is what politicians have long used to cling to power and shape our world. Corporations and social movements use it to mold your thoughts. Be happy with who you are — only if that “who” is on the approved list. Do what you want — only if that “what” is on this other list. And computers have been used with frightening efficiency by social engineers and by those who subvert democratic processes.

In 1970, some warned that “the computer’s potential for good, and the danger inherent in its misuse, exceed our ability to imagine. Wouldn’t that be the worst it could do — to become an instrument of tyranny, propelling mankind into a new dark age?”

And decades before that, Orwell, Huxley and Bradbury warned us in their fiction. Some people have listened.

Many more have not.

Categories: Critical Thinking, Modern History | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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