Posts Tagged With: marketing

A Writer? So why aren’t you Writing?

This is the second in a series on marketing.

When writers start learning about how to reach their audience, they are told to build a platform across multiple channels to reach their audience. Then they get frustrated when no one appears to be paying attention to their posts, so they stop posting.

Big mistake.

Even if you aren’t a writer, but especially if you are, you must keep putting yourself out there. I’m tired of the word “content,” but content is exactly what you need to be producing. You must do this whether or not anyone is reading at all.

Think about it. How many television shows barely made it through their first seasons before they got noticed and became runaway successes? I can think of a few like Seinfeld and Everyone Loves Raymond. How many were canceled only to be reborn because the supporters — and writers — didn’t stop working the system? Star Trek, anyone? How many authors started out unnoticed only to become successful a couple of books later? What if they had given up after the first or second book?

No one may be reading your first attempts, but no one will ever read what you have to say if it never exists.

Realize you are competing for attention among millions of other people. Nathan Berry writes (via Russell Brunson’s Traffic Secrets), “There is so much content being produced that we can’t possibly discover it all. So we wait for the best to float to the surface after time. If step one in building an audience is to create great content, step two is to endure long enough to get noticed.”

Each social media platform is idealized for different types of posts, lengths of posts, and frequency. The first decision you must make is which social media outlets best suit your style and output. You don’t need to be everywhere, and to do so will just eat up valuable time. A regular website should be your primary home. This is where all your information can be found, your longer musings, and all other sites are a gateway back to the homeland. Then figure out which handful of other sites can benefit your brand. They may become more active as far as posts go, but have somewhere substantial as your foundation.

So how often should you write on your internet platforms? Some recommend every day. I think it depends on the type of site: Your main page should be at least once or twice a week. Sites like Facebook or MeWe, four times. Instagram, also four. I don’t like sites like Twitter or Gab for authors. Too short and flippant. Also realize I am talking about your author sites. Keep personal stuff on personal pages. While your home website is a better place for expanded content, if you find yourself posting quite a bit on non-author\writing topics, start another dedicated page. Most sites allow you to write multiple posts and save them for later, or specify a predetermined time to publish. This lets you write multiple posts in one sitting and have days or weeks of content ready to go.

Don’t be spammy. No one wants endless “buy my book” ads. This is the old way of doing things. Document your process. Detail your passions. Tell your Story. You convince readers to buy your book by not telling them to buy it. Rather, show them why your Story is so amazing. I once had someone try to sell me a product by giving me all the stats and figures — technobabble. I understand all that, but tell me why you are compelled to use that product. How did it change you? As an author, you tell amazing stories. Show people the path into your Story and why it will change them.

As Virginia Woolf wrote, “…in order to make you understand, to give you my life, I must tell you a story.”

Contact and connect with Darrick here. Watch for newsletter sign-up coming soon. Get your copy of Among the Shadows and choose a side. Will it be on the side of Light? Or Darkness?

Categories: Writing | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Want a Free Book?

This is the first in a series on marketing.

That got your attention. Everyone likes free stuff, but authors hate giving away their work. I saw one writer get visibly upset when she saw me give away a book. I get it. Writing is hard work and most authors want to make a living telling stories. However, when you are just starting out, you need to invest in marketing your book.

Giving away free stuff is Marketing 101.

How many times has a retailer lured you in with BOGO offers or deeply discounted products (“loss leaders”)? They do it all the time, every day. It’s hard to see your book as a product, but you’re on the hunt for readers, right? Readers are your customer, and your book is your product.

I’m not saying you should give away all your books for free all the time. It should be part of an overall marketing plan. Free book contests. Donate them to local libraries. Have you ever see those little community book exchanges in parks and other locations? Keep copies in your car. You never know when the opportunity may arrive to give out your book, free or otherwise.

Running sales, just as all other businesses do, should also be part of your plans. Once you have multiple books published, deeply discounting the first — or making it free — gives a no-risk invitation to new readers.

Giving away your books shouldn’t be the only freebie in your arsenal. Think about what other free content you can give out such as excerpts of your books, or short stories set in the same storyverse. Consider putting these together in a low cost book format (paper or electronic) and give them out at events or on-line even to those who haven’t bought your book (especially to people who haven’t bought your book).

As authors, we don’t see ourselves merely as a business, or our readers as customers. We are looking for a deeper connection (and we will get into all that in future posts). Ultimately, getting your book out there requires a business mindset.

Most importantly, keep telling stories. Don’t stop until you Find Your Purpose, Find Your Story.

Contact and connect with Darrick here. Watch for newsletter sign-up coming soon. Get your copy of Among the Shadows and choose a side. Will it be on the side of Light? Or Darkness?

Categories: Books, Writing | Tags: , | Leave a comment

#FakeRules & #RealRules of Marketing

As Tim Ferriss wrote a few months ago:

Now, the bad news: no one “trick” will do the job. Marketing isn’t about hacks.

As renowned venture capitalist Ben Horowitz says: “There is no silver bullet. We’re going to have to use a whole lot of lead ones.”

There are a few hard and fast rules, but there is one you may have heard that isn’t true. It goes like this: “You have to get your advertisement in front of someone X times before they notice it, X more times before they click on it, and  X more times before they buy it.”

Baloney. #FakeRule. If it takes that long, one of the following is wrong:

A. You aren’t getting your book (or other product) in front of your market: The people that are actually interested in the genre you are writing.

B. Your ad isn’t good, or not connecting with people (or maybe, especially if you’re an author, you don’t get branding).

C.  A combination of A. and B.

I have wrote about how everyone has access to marketing tools on-line, and everyone is using them, so you are competing with thousands for potential readers. At the end of the day, however, the above points still apply. Many have seen the promises of easy, cheap ads on Facebook and forget how advertising works.

It comes down to money. Continue reading

Categories: Writing | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Creating Your Author Brand (Pt. 2): Your Authentic Voice

Katie Phillips Creative Services

It’s my privilege to welcome Lisa to my blog today. I’ve known her for several years now and have watched her journey through difficult circumstances to find her bold, unique voice that is at once compassionate and compelling. Who better to share her story of discovering her authentic voice than this beautiful woman who has fought for it so hard? 

I spent ten years trying to brand myself.

If I wasn’t thinking about my personal brand as a writer, maker, and coach, I was working at digital agencies large and small that specialized in branding, reading up on the subject, teaching on it, and writing about it. For two and a half years I even ran a boutique branding agency that worked exclusively with creative entrepreneurs. I watched dozens of writers, artists, coaches, healers, and the like wrestle deeply with how to “show up” in their marketplace.

By the time…

View original post 1,136 more words

Categories: Writing | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

How to Create Your Author Brand (Pt. 1)

Katie Phillips Creative Services

Your author brand is nothing more than your authentic story. 

Let’s set aside all the fancy talk of platforms and networking, fonts and social media strategies, logos and websites, brand archetypes and all the “expert advice.” Because none of that matters until you know your story.

You probably think your story is your book. Your words on the page. And you’d be partially correct. But that’s not your whole story. 

Your story is the experiences and struggles that inspired you to write your book. Your story is all the late nights and early mornings typing away while your kids slept. Your story is the hidden wounds you work through with your characters and the message in your heart you’re desperate for people to know.

You’re living your story right now. 

And the story that you’re living is just as important – if not more – than the story you’re telling…

View original post 282 more words

Categories: Writing | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

Share Your Story, Be Authentic

The internet is a wild and woolly place and this can make it hard to truly connect with other people. Are there ways to make this easier so you can truly “friend” those who would like to hear or read what you have to say?

Melyssa Griffin explains 17 Things for optimizing your blog posts so people take notice of them.  What about your newsworthy Facebook posts? Here are tips on using those hashtags to put those posts in front of more readers.

But wait, there’s more…

Making connections, networking, “building your tribe,” or whatever you want to call it, all mean the same thing, but this is only half of the equation. Sure, you want people to read what you write, or buy what you have to sell — maybe you even want to make a living at it — but you have to show that you’re more than just the next guy or gal peddling this or that.

Show them why what you have to say is important to you, and them. Prove why your story is important to theirs. Creating a team, a tribe, or a movement, requires authenticity. Be a human, not a faceless voice.

 

Categories: Writing | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Write, Build a Tribe, and Publish

Some great articles around the web for writers this week:

Author Nadine Brandes writes on how marketing is no longer just about running ads, but connecting with your readers and building a tribe. If it’s hard for you to find time to write, Honorée Corder explains how to make writing second nature. Trying to figure out the ever-changing publishing landscape? Turns out that the mass market paperback market just won’t die — not completely anyway.

Categories: Writing | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Darkness vs. Light

The new trailer for Among the Shadows is here. Check it out and share away:

[Video clips licensed from Shutterstock.com, music from MelodyLoops.com and voiceover by Ricky Whelan.]

Categories: Writing | Tags: , , , , , | 1 Comment

12 Things for Writers and Much More

Novelist Maria Murnane has posted a couple of useful posts for writers: Twelve things you can do to help promote your book, Marketing tip: Keep your email signature clean and Feeling discouraged about your book sales? Read this!. Check out Maria’s site for even more useful tips.

Categories: Writing | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Peter Falk Can Help Sell More Books

Getting your book in front of people is only half the battle. That’s the easy part. Grabbing their interest among the thousands of other things vying for their attention — that’s the hard part. Author Jaimie Engle discusses here how Peter Falk — in The Princess Bride no less — helped her crack the case.

Categories: Writing | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: